Jul 07
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If you really, really, really need Flash working on your precious tablet and if you have been courageous enough to jailbreak your $600+ puppy – here is a nice step by step guide (photos/video) on how to install the darn thing: MGN Flash Tutorial

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Mar 30
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Given Adobe Flash’s ubiquity, the lack of Flash support is certainly one of the biggest turn-offs for potential iPad buyers. On the other hand, some of leading publishers are sidestepping the issue by providing alternative video streaming methods.

For example both Brightcove platform which enables them to detect the visitor’s operating system and to route the appropriate video stream accordingly.

Brightcove for iPhone OS

So, let’s say, if an iPad user hits the publisher’s page, Brightcove will detect Apple iPhone OS on the visitor’s system and will stream H.264-encoded video renditions optimized for iPad screen resolution via html5. Problem solved.

Here is Brightcove’s sales pitch to publishers:

Ready for Apple iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch
Reduce the cost and complexity of delivering and monetizing video on current and future generations of Apple devices that support the HTML5 standard. Deliver the best possible video experience to iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch users.

Automatic Device Detection
Brightcove automatic device detection dynamically switches between Flash and HTML5 player templates to suit the viewer’s device capabilities.

Native HTML5 Player Templates
New HTML5 templates provide multi-title playlists, analytics tracking, social sharing controls, advertising insertion, and other capabilities to provide a customizable video experience built on open standards.

Gorgeous H.264 transcoding
Brightcove’s cloud transcoding engine converts virtually any source file into H.264-encoded video renditions optimized for multiple encoding profiles, bit rates, and screen sizes.

Pricing and Availability
The Brightcove Experience for HTML5 is provided at no charge to customers with subscriptions to Brightcove Professional, Enterprise, and Express $499 editions. An early version of the automatic device detection and HTML5 player template are available in the Brightcove Developer Center. Additional capabilities will be provided in future versions released throughout 2010.

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Mar 24
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USA Today had a 2-page cover story on the iPad today – here are the highlights:

On Opportunity:
“If there ever was a space to do some land-grabbing in, this is it,” says Lahman, Gogii’s CEO.

On Sales Projections
The iPhone spawned a $1 billion-a-year industry for app developers, says analyst Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray. He predicts first-year sales of 2.7 million iPads, compared with 4 million iPhones in the first year. The iPhone has grown to become a third of Apple’s business, says Munster. The iPad has the potential to represent 10% to 15% of Apple’s annual revenue by 2012, he says.

On Development Induced by Anxiety
“I’d rather be in early than sit back and wait and let my competitors get early traction,” says Ken Willner, CEO of Zumobi, a Seattle-based developer of ad-supported apps for big media brands including MSNBC and Today. “It’s a larger device, so it’s better for advertising.”

On Living Room Takeover
“This is the iPhone moving into the living room,” says Bart Decrem, CEO of Tapulous. Its Tap Tap Revenge is one of the iPhone’s most popular games, with 25 million downloads. “In the short term, it’s an extension of the iPhone. In the long term, it’s a brand-new platform that will move eyeballs off gaming consoles and laptops.”

On Drawbacks
Like the iPhone, the iPad doesn’t support Adobe’s Flash software, which is used to watch most online video. That mean videos at popular sites such as Hulu and ComedyCentral.com can’t be viewed, and neither can videos at thousands of other websites that rely on Flash.
Additionally, the iPad doesn’t have slots for common computer add-ons, such as, say, a USB flash drive or external hard drive. If you want to import your own video clips, for instance, you’re out of luck, unless you first put them in Apple’s iTunes software and transfer them from the computer, or figure a way to move them via the Web.

No Flash, no available slots, too big to fit into a pocket: Those are huge drawbacks, Enderle says.

And a bit of self-promotion…
USA TODAY will have an iPad app available on April 3. It will be free for the first 90 days, sponsored by Courtyard by Marriott. After that, USA TODAY will announce subscription pricing.

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Feb 18
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(video interview w/Lynch, Adobe CTO below)

There is a lot of noise (and bad vibes) in the media regarding Apple’s decision to not enable Adobe Flash on the iPad. Reports range from claims that Steve Jobs called Adobe (and Google) lazy to assertion that Apple is still negotiating with Adobe. To sum it up, Apple sees Flash as a memory hogging and buggy piece of junk and, to protect the user and user experience, the decision was made to not include support for it.

Case closed, Apple will join a slew of other companies in support of HTML5, a standard that will bring us online video without the need to run an embedded or standalone media player… The decision ticked off many and th developers leveraging Adobe’s tools (Design Suite, Flash, Air, etc.) are certainly among the loudest.

My take on this is a bit different – while I hate when Flash hogs my CPU and RAM – I still see Flash as a pretty solid application (with quite a bit of room for improvement). I believe that Apple’s decision is almost solely based on the company’s strategy to protect the iTunes app revenue channel. At this point, aside from the jailbreaking circus, Adobe Flash is the only serious danger to the App Store. Imagine being able to run flash and all freebie flash games and apps that are floating in the cyberspace – that’d be sweet but it would certainly cut into the iTunes Apps sales.

Let’s finish on a brighter note: here is an interview with Kevin Lynch, Adobe CTO – it touches on several points I wrote about above. Lynch is defensive throughout the interview and he’s trying to play nice – this interview does not help Adobe in convincing both the customer and the Street that all is rosy. Yet, it’s not Lynch’s fault! Whoever is in charge of PR at Adobe should have stopped this and let a strong business person navigate this very rugged landscape.

Credit goes to AllThingsDigital

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